Enfield-Rifles.com Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Enfields > Enfield Rifles
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Lacquer covered rifles
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Lacquer covered rifles

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
Message
AussieShooter View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: April 14 2019
Location: Chicago, IL
Status: Offline
Points: 209
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AussieShooter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Lacquer covered rifles
    Posted: October 15 2021 at 3:50pm
Recently I have noticed an increasing number number of Lee Enfields for sale that have been painted in a clear coat, some type of lacquer.  Not just the wood, but also much of the metal components, especially the receiver.  I think it looks terrible (sorry to offend anyone who likes it).

There was one rifle I was interested in but I had no idea how to remove the lacquer. Has anyone had experience stripping this clear coat off a rifle, and is it possible without doing more damage to the wood or the metal components?  Thanks for your thoughts.
"Corruptissima re publica plurimae leges" - Tacitus
The more corrupt the state, the more it legislates
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
pisco View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: November 21 2018
Location: australia
Status: Offline
Points: 182
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pisco Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 15 2021 at 5:32pm
I have had a couple and I used paint stripper 
Back to Top
A square 10 View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member

Donating Member

Joined: December 12 2006
Location: MN , USA
Status: Offline
Points: 12278
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote A square 10 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 15 2021 at 6:22pm
there used to be extensive info on the proceedures available on these sites , i would hope we have some of it archived , strip it with finish remover then steam out any dents and dings that bother you then refinish with BLO is the quick response , it takes a lot of time but is rewarding in the end 
Back to Top
SW28fan View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar
Donating Member

Joined: July 02 2007
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 2756
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SW28fan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 16 2021 at 7:12am
I think this was a quasi official action by one or more secondary users.  A bright Idea by people who really didn't know much about guns. 
Have a Nice Day
If already having a nice day please disregard
Back to Top
Zed View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar
Donating Member

Joined: May 01 2012
Location: France
Status: Offline
Points: 4645
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 16 2021 at 7:25am
Yes the clear coat is horrible.
My L39A1 was like that when I bought it. Paint stripper for the wood once it's been removed from the metal. You can steam out minor dents if the grain is not split. Then refinish with linseed oil or boiled linseed oil. 
It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice!
Back to Top
Canuck View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar
Donating Member

Joined: January 17 2012
Location: Agassiz BC
Status: Offline
Points: 3257
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Canuck Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 16 2021 at 8:34am
I've used acetone. It works quickly but must be used in a very well ventilated area, preferably outdoors. Wear gloves.
Castles made of sand slip into the sea.....eventually
Back to Top
Zed View Drop Down
Special Member
Special Member
Avatar
Donating Member

Joined: May 01 2012
Location: France
Status: Offline
Points: 4645
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 16 2021 at 11:41am
Acetone is good for degreasing and removing oils etc. I've not tried it on lacquer. It's quite unpleasant stuff though; the vapours are bad and will make you dizzy if not well ventilated as Canuck mentioned. 
Take care if using it and do not smoke (everWink)
It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice!
Back to Top
paddyofurniture View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: December 26 2011
Location: NC
Status: Offline
Points: 4007
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote paddyofurniture Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 16 2021 at 12:56pm
I Do Not smoke but I will in the hereafter. No problem I say, I will see you there. 

Acetone is nasty stuff. Get it on your hands and your finger nails will comeoff. As me how I know.
Always looking for military manuals, Dodge M37 items,books on Berlin Germany, old atlases ( before 1946) , military maps of Scotland. English and Canadian gun parts.
Back to Top
AussieShooter View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: April 14 2019
Location: Chicago, IL
Status: Offline
Points: 209
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AussieShooter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 16 2021 at 2:59pm
OK, so don't necessarily be afraid of the clear coat rifles, but it is a lot of work to "refinish" back to something original.  Great to know.   I will search the forum and see if I can find the older posts/stickies.  Thanks for the input.  Oh yeah, and be careful with the cigar while using acetone in the closed gun room inside the house!  Just Kidding Tongue
"Corruptissima re publica plurimae leges" - Tacitus
The more corrupt the state, the more it legislates
Back to Top
paddyofurniture View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: December 26 2011
Location: NC
Status: Offline
Points: 4007
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote paddyofurniture Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 16 2021 at 4:28pm
Is that the flash, and then you see God?
Always looking for military manuals, Dodge M37 items,books on Berlin Germany, old atlases ( before 1946) , military maps of Scotland. English and Canadian gun parts.
Back to Top
bubba ho tep View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie


Joined: June 19 2017
Location: Ruaral KY abode
Status: Offline
Points: 61
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bubba ho tep Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 16 2021 at 5:06pm
Over the years I found that gel type paint stripping agents work the best for lacquer/polyurethane type goober finishes. I always addressed small areas at a time with old towels and or old cotton tee shirts with a few worn tooth brushes on hand to get into spots. I really think any real liquidy type chemical stripping agents are too aggressive and dry out wood and remove too much of any real color and patina of the wood trapped under the bubba finish. With the gel strippers I let them sit only just long enough then remove quickly . Too long and it will remove a lot of what is original left in the wood to even screwing with original markings left . It 's the owners call to undue the bubba slowly and meticulously or be just as bubba and get in a hurry and have bare wood and start the bubba process over. On some rifle stocks that have been sanded to all he!!...hardly worth the effort as they will always look belt sanded and pimp shined. YMMV as well as one's tastes.
Back to Top
Grizzly ‘76 View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie
Avatar

Joined: September 25 2021
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 33
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Grizzly  ‘76 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 17 2021 at 2:56pm
he!!o , 
Last winter I restored a couple of milsurplus rifles that had lacquered stocks . I did research and found the majority of folks were using an Orange based finish removing gel . Since it was January here in the Middle East US it needed to be done indoors or wait until late spring . The brand I used was Eazy Strip from the local big box hardware store . I purchased a plastic throw away putty knife for stubborn areas to use as a scraper without damaging the wood . #0000 steel wool and lots of blue roll shop towels . I also wore HD vinyl paint stripping gloves . It was a fast acting gel and really did a great job . I followed the instructions on the product label . After removing the lacquer, I washed the stock in very hot water . Allowed it to dry slowly and used pure orange oil to degrease or get anything left . Orange oil will also restore oils removed from the wood during the strip process. Orange oil was applied sparingly with an old tooth brush , a littl goes a long way .  I then steamed out dents and gouges using a damp cloth and an old steam clothes iron bought from the local thrift store for $4. DO NOT USE YOUR WIFES GOOD ONE ! The finish I choose to use was BLO furniture finish imported from England . After multiple coats of that and a nice color achieved, I used Birchwood - Casey gun stock wax . The action on the rifles I was working on were blued , and those were “touched up” in rusty areas , while blending into the intact original finish . I’m not an expert but I love working on old boom sticks . I try to match original finish types as closely as possible. Hope this was helpful. 
Back to Top
bubba ho tep View Drop Down
Groupie
Groupie


Joined: June 19 2017
Location: Ruaral KY abode
Status: Offline
Points: 61
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bubba ho tep Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 17 2021 at 3:26pm
Here's the thing...using hot water to rinse or whaterver takes the sharpness of any original markings in the wood out the window...that is a no go with me. The water also causes the wood to swell and it's drying process as well causes problems with markings and metal parts not easily or not removeable from old wood. I don't nor would ever recommend water introduced to the process of restoring old original wood. But if it's been belt like bubba sanded...all bets are off and do as you please.
    I am a bit of a puritan on mucking with old wood and old finishes...the least you do the better !!!!.
Back to Top
AussieShooter View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: April 14 2019
Location: Chicago, IL
Status: Offline
Points: 209
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AussieShooter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 17 2021 at 3:59pm
Looks like we are exploring some good techniques and addressing some areas of caution.  I would not have anticipated the impact water has in the wood but it does make sense. Great debate. 
"Corruptissima re publica plurimae leges" - Tacitus
The more corrupt the state, the more it legislates
Back to Top
Marco1010 View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: February 04 2020
Location: New Zealand
Status: Offline
Points: 318
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Marco1010 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 17 2021 at 5:40pm
I normally use the method of wrapping the woodwork in paper towels that are impregnated with acetone.
Leave for about 10 Minutes then unwrap. Much of the old varnish and gunk will come off on the towels.
Repeat as necessary.  You don't want to soak the wood too much with the acetone or it will tend to end up a bit bleached out.  Hard to clean areas, just use some acetone sparingly and scrub with an old tooth brush.  afterwards wipe down with isopropyl alcohol or white spirits with a soft cloth.  Then leave a day to make sure any solvents are well gone.  Then to work with BLO or artists linsead oil.
If trying to match colours of the wood work I used a linsead oil based stain as the first coat.

A trick if you are trying to get that really dark aged look, apply the linsead oil stain and then run over the surface for a few seconds with a blow torch till it bubbles a bit,  then polish with a rag. repeated oiling - blow torch - polishing gives a nice deep rich aged colour.  if the linsead oil stain catches fire , just drop the woodwork into a handy bucket of water...   for obvious reasons have a fire extinguisher / hose handy and do this all outside away from combustable surfaces.
Back to Top
AussieShooter View Drop Down
Senior Member
Senior Member
Avatar

Joined: April 14 2019
Location: Chicago, IL
Status: Offline
Points: 209
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AussieShooter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: October 21 2021 at 6:51pm
I was reading a long and detailed article on a reloading forum for the discontinued S&W 44 Russian.  Anyway, one of the posters recommended printing the thread as you will never find it again.  The light bulb went off.   I know its obvious, but I never thought about it.

There are some good ideas here so I am going to Save this to my computer. 
"Corruptissima re publica plurimae leges" - Tacitus
The more corrupt the state, the more it legislates
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.04
Copyright ©2001-2021 Web Wiz Ltd.